Building Wonder

When it comes to presenting data, protocols for data, and the administrative use and sharing of data – there’s a lot to know.  High level stats, privacy rights, statistical coding, and more… yet we ask professionals who are experts at lesson design to be aware of all of this and how to leverage data to measure effectiveness.  I simplify it down to one simple rule: Continue reading → Building Wonder

Telling the Right Data Story

At the end of last year, I had presented what I had thought were beautiful and informative data reports, analyzing millions of data points across 9 years.  I took my findings to my administration expecting that they might offer me praise, redefine or add a possible role for me, and give me some free lance duties as a data expert.  However, the reaction I received was quite different. Continue reading → Telling the Right Data Story

How Do Students Use Data? How about a little self-reporting and google sheets…

As we moved to Standards Based Reporting, the emphasis on summative feedback increased, whether intentionally or not.  Unfortunately that meant our formative feedback tracking became a little inconsistent.  So I had the idea (as many teachers do) to have the students self-track and self-report. Continue reading → How Do Students Use Data? How about a little self-reporting and google sheets…

Does Advancing Students Too Early Hinder Their Mathematical Outlook?

In the 1980’s and 1990’s, there was a push in the United States to have every student reach algebra by 8th grade.  It was a political measure mostly to compete with the results of other countries.  However, it seems that experiment has failed and now with the advent of the Common Core, they have explicitly warned against accelerating the progress of learning mathematics.  Here’s what it says: Continue reading → Does Advancing Students Too Early Hinder Their Mathematical Outlook?